Thursday, January 29, 2009

You wouldn't let your pet eat from this 100+ year old bowl...



Nope, you probably won't find anyone with a bowl such as this one being used for their pet's dining. That's because this bowl is over 100 years old and was made by a working potter in Middle Tennessee during the 19th century. Commonly referred to as a dog bowl, that was not its only purpose. Bowls such as these were also used as a rabbit feeding bowl, cat bowl, etc. It has a beautiful salt glaze with drippings - I love to see that on old pottery. Pretty hefty in weight the bowl was durable and still is after all these years. It is a highly desirable piece and sought after by southern pottery collectors. It's value is approximately $130.00.

The blue gray circle that you see here happened as a result of the piece being stacked beneath another piece of pottery in the firing process.

We found lots of great things, such as this bowl, on our buying trip this past week-end. We'll talk about some of our finds throughout the week-end and next week and will be adding some of our finds to our website.

5 comments:

willow said...

Wow! Nice. I have an old ovid jug with a similar salt glaze with drippings. What are some thing I can look for to try to date it?

Kim and David said...

Hi Willow, Ovoid jugs are highly sought after as well (the more ovoid the better), so you probably have a great piece. Old pieces from the 1800s usually have a more mellow surface, even though they can still have some shine due to the glazing. But, the shine is not bright. Later (20th century) pieces usually have a "crystal clear like" look to the glaze. Also, on the bottom of the piece you will see evidence of the jug being placed on hard surfaces throughout its life, indicating appropriate wear. If you really want to learn about pottery, you should look at it everytime you are at a show or shop. Over time you will develope an eye for the age. That is the very best way of knowing. You will soon train your eye to pick up on the differences between 19th & early 20th century pieces (alot of pottery was made during that time as well). In Tennessee we can often determine the region in which the piece was made by examining the color of the clay, glazes, etc. You may be able to do this with your piece, if you are familiar with the process in your regions. Is your piece from Ohio? You can send me a pic and I would be happy to take a look at it for you. Send one of the bottom as well. Glad you liked the piece. Kim

willow said...

Thanks, Kim. As soon as I replace my camera, I will send you some pix. I bought the jug in Ohio, and it is almost exactly the same color and speckled glaze with drippings as your bowl. The bottom looks very old to me. It's about 11inches tall and 9 inches across.

John Foster said...

Wow, this is a beautiful object. Simple. Functional. So American. can't wait to see what else you found.

j. Winkel said...

This is great, as is your observation